© Copyright 2008-2018 All rights reserved, Bankfoot Inn Ltd.

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Main Street, Bankfoot, Perthshire, Scotland, PH1 4AB

Tel: 01738 787243     Email: info@bankfootinn.co.uk

At some point in the past, our public bar was once the post office. It was not until 1942 that the two properties were joined into what the Bankfoot Inn is today.

 

From 2007, the Bankfoot Inn has undergone a series of much needed refurbishments to bring it up to where it is today. It's been a lot of work, but also a lot of fun.

 

The Bankfoot Inn started off with just a couple of bedrooms and the dining room was originally upstairs. There were stables to the rear of the inn where coachmen could put their horses for the night. The stables are still there today.

 

The Bankfoot Inn is a traditional Coaching Inn. The principal part of the inn (the part comprising the main door, lounge bar & restaurant) was initially built in the 1760's (hard to be precise). It was a free standing building, with the attached houses being built later from 1790.

 

Historic Perthshire Hotel dating from 1760

Bankfoot is located in the county of Perthshire, about 6 miles north of the city of Perth.

The village of Bankfoot (known as Auchtergaven before 1811) is in the parish of Auchtergaven (from the Gaelic uachdar-gamhainn, meaning "upland of the yearling cattle"). The village was built on the main road north to Dunkeld, Inverness and the Highlands and was a place for travellers to rest and weary horses stabled for the night. The Bankfoot Inn was one of the main coaching inns serving the village.

 

History of the Bankfoot Inn

Image credit: Copyright VisitScotland / Jacub Iwanicki, all rights reserved

Dating from about 1760, the Bankfoot Inn has a rich history.

HISTORIC INN

The Village of Bankfoot
The Bankfoot Inn

In 1764, it is believed that the local Jacobites bought the inn as a gift to a local family.

 

In the 1940s, during the war, the inn was taken over by the Army as officers accommodation. It was also at this time that the Inn was used to house children evacuated from the cities.

 

We know of one story from this period of a lone enemy bomber aircraft trying to locate a military target. Fortunately, despite circling the village with its bomb bay doors open, it dumped its deadly payload in a field before leaving.